MONTGOMERY COUNTY

EZRA BOSTICK or BOSTWICK was born in Queen Anne County, Maryland, in 1753. He enlisted under Captain Patrick Began, North Carolina troops, Octber 15, 1780, serving under different officers until the close of the war. He came to Illinois, settled in Montgomery County in 1818, in the Bostick settlement, not far from the present village of Irving. He lies buried in the little grave-yard not far from the village of Irving.


HENRY BRIANCE was a native of North Carolina, where he entered the service in 1777, serving under Colonel Wad Hampton, General Thomas Sumter and General Francis Marion. He was engage in the battles of Eutaw Springs, Fridays Fort, Thomapson's Fort, Monk's Corner and Monroe Old Field. He came to Illinois and resided in Montgomery County, where he died August 19, 1833.


THOMAS BRECKMAN was born in Albemarle County, Virginia. He entered the service early in 1776, under Captain John Marks, Col. Charles Lewis' Regiment, in General Nathaniel Greene's division of the army, serving for three years; he also served under Captain Archibald Moon, was in the battles of Brandywine, Germantown, STony Point, and other smaller engagements. He came to Illinois, residing in Montgomery County, where he was buried in a little grave-yeard which is now a pasture owned by Joseph Spinner. He died about 1838. The grave of Thomas Breckman is one of many unmarked, almost unknown, in the history of our country. Truly they lie "Beneath the roots of tangled weeds," in so many of our country grave-yards.


JOHN CANNADAY Although the veteran signed his name as John Cannaday, the family surname also appears as Kannaday, Canaday, and Kanaday. At the time of his enlistment the veteran was a resident of Bedford County, Virginia. In 1832 he was residing in Casey County, Kentucky, and in 1836 he was living in Montgomery County, Illinois. When the veteran applied for pension he stated that he enlisted about the first of September 1781 and served at various times until about Christmas 1783, amounlting to 1 year and 9 months, as Private with the Virginia Troops under Captains Charles Callaway, Kirkpatrick, Yauber, Deade, and Irish and Colonels Callaway and Feebecker. He also stated that he served during the siege at Yorktown. He was pensioned on Certificate 7 616, which was issued under the Act of June7, 1832. The pension was paid at the Kentucky Agency (transferred to the Illinois Agency). His burial location in Montgomery County is unknown. Submitted by Charles L. Canaday, Chandler, AZ Canaday 610@aol.com


JOHN CRABTREE was born in Randolph County, North Carolina, May 3, 1763. He entered the service in 1780 under Captain Edward Williams; he again enlisted under Captain John Knight. Coming to Illinois, he settled in Montgomery County in what was known as the "Street Settlement," about four miles from Hillsboro. He was among the early settlers, and lies buried in the family grave-yard not far from the old homestead.


THOMAS CRAIG, was born in Granville County, North Carolina, October, 1762 and died in Montgomery County 7 November, 1839. He enlisted in 1781, serving in Captain Smith's Company, Colonel McKissick's Regiment. He re-enlisted in Lincoln County, in the Indian spy service, serving under Captain Brown Stimson and Captain John Sevier. He came to Illinois, settling in Montgomery County, East Fork township. He is buried in Mt. Moriah Cemetery, near Coffeen, Illinois. Thomas Craig was married to the former Frances Brown. He was pensioned on 2-28-1833, pension #530971. Additional information provided by Nora Tocus ectocus@21stcentury.net


BENJAMIN GORDON was born in Newberry County, South Carolina, August 30, 1763. He enlisted in 1780 under General Thomas Sumter, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. After the battle of Guilford Court House, he was sent as wagoner, with the wounded to General Nthaniel Greene's army. Later he served as a mountaineer ranger under General Clark of Georgia. He was discharged in 1783. He came to Montgomery County, Illinois, to reside, living in the hurricane settlement. He received a pension for his services. The place of his burial is unknown.


WOOTEN HARRIS was a native of Virginia, where he enlisted in Captain Elliot's Company of Militia, Brunswick County, in 1777, serving ninety days; he again enlisted under Captain William Peterson, Colonel Harrison's Regiment. He served till the close of the war. Coming to Illinois, he settled in Montgomery County in the Hurricane settlement. He died in 1837 and was buried in the Scribner burying ground, Fillmore township; but several years ago his remains were removed to the Fillmore grave-yard, where they now repose. He was pensioned.


JOHN LIGET was a native of Virginia, but entered the service under Captain John Reese in 1776; was transferred to Captain Plunkett's Company, Fourth Regiment, Light Dragoons of Pennsylvania line of troops. He was taken prisoner in 1778, but soon escaped and rejoined the army under Washington, serving until the close of the war. He was in the battles of White Plains, Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine, Germantown and other smaller engagements. Truly a valiant soldier! He came to Montgomery County, settling in the Bostick settlement. The place of his burial is not known.


HARRIS REVIS was born in Northampton County, North Carolina, in 1750. He enlisted under Sergeant Langham, Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina, in 1780. He was stationed at the Magazine, where he remained till the close of the war. He came to Illinois with his brotehr Henry, who is buried in Madison County. Harris REvis settled in Montgomery County, was a commissioner of thsi county during its early history. He died in 1837 near his home and was buried in the Wright grave-yard.


JAMES RICHARDSON was born in Middlesex County, Virginia, August 25, 1757. He entered the service under Captain Lemuel Smith, Colonel Peter Perkins' Regiment, Virginia troops, August, 1780. He also served under Captain Miner Smith, General Rutherford's command. He was in the battles of Brick House and Georgetown. Coming to Illinois, he settled in Montgomery County, and died in Hillsboro.

JAMES WALKER was born ca. 1760 in Virginia, or possibly in North Carolina. He served for three months at the close of the war in a North Carolina regiment and was mustered out after the surrender of Lord Cornwallis. The only documentary evidence pertaining to James Walker’s Revolutionary War activity was North Carolina Revolutionary War claim number 2241 which auditors James Miller and Alexander Erwin allowed James Walker of Morgan District, North Carolina on 17 September 1783. Samuel Greenlee was the signatory clerk. Since Morgan District encompassed the counties of Burke, Lincoln, Rutherford, Sullivan, Washington, and Wilkes, it is necessary to demonstrate that the voucher issued to James Walker concerned the James Walker of Burke County. James Walker married Nancy Bradley (born ca. 1769 Orange County,
Virginia) in Wilkes County, North Carolina on 11 February 1797. He is listed on the 1815 tax list of BURKE COUNTY, North Carolina and lived on Lower Creek in Captain Clinton Hartley's district in BURKE COUNTY which is CALDWELL COUNTY today. James Walker removed to Illinois about 1827. He appeared in the Montgomery County, Illinois census of 1830. James Walker did not acquire any property in Montgomery County until 5 October 1832 when he entered 80 acres in Section 19 Township 8 North Range 2 West for $100.00 from the federal government. On 28 April 1836 James Walker had a second patent in Montgomery County for the southwest quarter of the northwest quarter of Section 10, Township 8 North Range 2 West. His wife, Nancy (Bradley) Walker died in Montgomery County, Illinois on 15 August 1844 aged 75 years. The inscription on her stone identifies her as the wife of “James W. Walker.” No other record has been found in which James Walker appeared with the middle initial “W.” James Walker died on 6 August 1845 aged 85. He and his wife were buried
in the Wright Cemetery, Montgomery County, Van Burensburg, Illinois. They had 11 children. Information provided by Roy O. Walker and Betty Walker-Braundmeier.



DEWITT COUNTY

EDWARD DAY was born in Charlotte county, Virginia, in 1760; he enlisted from that county in Captain Collier's Company, Colonel Morgan's Regiment when only sixteen years of age, serving five months; he again served in Captain William Price's Company, Colonel Randolph's Regiment, sreving three months; re-enlisting in Captain Collier's Company, Colonel Randolph's Regiment, he served three months; again enlisting he was in Captain Gideon Spencer's Company, Colonel Randolph's Regiment, serving two months, thus making a fine record of service for his country. He came to Illinois, settling in DeWitt County where he lies buried in De Witt cemetery; died in 1836. Edward Day was the grandfather of Hon. W. H. Herndon, a law partner of Abraham Lincoln.

JOHN SCOTT was a native of Pennsylvania, born in York county, Mary 29, 1763. He enlisted from Washington county, Virginia in May 1780, in Captain James Dysart's Company, Colonel William Gamble's Regiment, Virginia line of troops, serving one year; he was in the battles of King's Mountain and Wetzell's Mills. The family came to Sangamon county, Illinois, in 1824; removed to DeWitt county where he died Nov. 13, 1847, and is buried in Rock Creek cemetery, near Waynesville.

PETER CUTRIGHT was a native of Virginia, born in Hampshire county, 1759. He enlisted September 1, 1780, and served six months with Captains Daniel Riteson and Robert Cravens, Colonel Robert Stevens commanding. Peter Cutright came to Illinois and resided for a time in Macon County, his application for pension being from that county in 1833. He lived in Sangamon county until three years before his death, when he was a resident of DeWitt county, where his last pension was drawn September 4, 1841. The place of his burial is not known.

WILLIAM VINSON or VINCENT was a native of Virginia, serving in the Virginia line of troops. He came to Illinois in 1828, settling at Long Point Timber, DeWitt county. He applied for a pension in McLean county. He died in DeWitt county in 1836, and is buried in Rock Creek cemetery.

EFFINGHAM COUNTY

CHARLES MOORE was born in Hanover county, Virginia, January 11, 1763; he enlisted from Salisbury district, Rowan county, North Carolina, serving for three months, 1779, in Captain James Craig's Company, Major Montflorance's Regiment; again for three months in Captain Benjamin Smith's company Colonel Matthew Brandon's Regiment; again for six months from 1780 in Captain Robert Glasby's Company. He was in the battle of King's mountain. He came to Illinois, settled in Sangamon county, built a cotton gin near Buffalo Hart Grove, in 1823/24. From there he removed to McLean county, settling in what is now Woodford county. Whgoing to draw a pension the stage upset and caused his death. He died Spetember 19, 1839, and is probably buried at Ewington, Effingham county.

MACOUPIN COUNTY

HURIAH GILMORE was a soldier of the Revolution, enlisting in the Virginia line of troops. He was born in North Carolina in 1749; he came to Illinois and resided in Morgan county, but removed to Macoupin, where he died. The place of his burial is not known.

ROBERT BUSBY was born in Hanover county, Virginia, July, 1759; he served in the Virginia line of troops, and was pensioned for his services. He came to Illinois and as a resident of Morgan county in 1839, but removed to Macoupin county, and died there; the place of his burial is not yet known.

THOMAS MOORE was born January 24, 1760, in Rockingham county, Virginia. He served in the Virginia line of troops under Captain Peter May, Colonel Glenn. After the close of the war he removed to Kentucky, and in 1831, came to Illinois, settling in Macoupin county, where he died and is buried on the land which he and his brother entered, called the Moore Cemetery.

JOSHUA RICHARDSON was also a native of Virginia, born December 19, 1762, in Bedford County. He served in the Virginia line of troops. He came to Illinois and settled in Macoupin county, where he died March 14, 1844.

JOHN PEEBLES was born about 1762, he enlisted early in the service. We copy an extract from his affidavit made in the year 1847; "I entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated under Captain Nettles, and immediately joined General Marion's army. I was at the battle of Eutaw Springs, and was in North Carolina in what was called the "truce land", and was engaged in scouting parties against the tories. I was not discharge from the service until after military operations had ceased." After the war, he removed to Kentucky, and later to Illinois, in Macoupin county, where he died October 6, 1849. He lies buried in the cemetery near Chesterfield. A few years since the members of the family erected a monument to the memory of this Revolutionary hero.

BOND COUNTY

Through the effort of Mrs. C. E. Davidson and the Benjamin Mills Chapter of Greenville, the following list of Revolutionary soldiers has been established and several graves marked.

CHARLES JOHNSON was born in North Carolina in 1757. After the outbreak of the war, he joined the State militia and participated in the battles of Cowpens and Guilford Court House. In 1817 he became a resident of Illinois Territory, settling in Bond County. He died in 1821 and is buried in the Old Grace cemetery, near the village of Pocahontas. His grave is marked by a United States tombstone, upon which is engraved his military service.

HEZEKIAH ROW was a native of South Carolina, born June 17, 1759. He served as a private in the South Carolina troops, and was pensioned. He died in Bond County, Illinois, in 1835.

JOSEPH McADAMS was born in York County, Pennsylvania, in 1759. He enlisted from Hawfield, Orange County, North Carolina, serving under Colonels Armstrong, William O'Neale, and Robert Melone, also with Captain Carrington and Captain Hodge; he was also a pilot under Colonel Lee; was in the battles of Stono, Hillsborough and Holts' Race Paths. Joseph McAdams came to Illinois with William McAdams, who lived in Madison County, and who was also a Revolutionary soldier. Joseph McAdams lived to be very aged, dying in Bond County.

PETER HUBBARD was a native of South Carolina, born about 1747. He served three years under Captains Samuel Wise and John Carraway Smith, with Colonel William Thompson. He served at various times until the close of the war. He was made lieutenant, and was in the battle of Sullivan's Island. He removed to Tennessee, and from there to Bond County, Illinois, where he died.

THOMAS WHITE was a native of Pennsylvania. He served as lieutenant in Colonel Bull's Regiment, Flying Camp, Pennsylvania troops. He was first lieutenant in Captain William Armstrong's company; was taken prisoner on November 16, 1776; was taken to New York where he endured great suffering. He escpaed from the British, June 27, 1777, and enlisted in Colonel William Montgomery's Regiment. Thomas White caem to Illinois, settling in Bond County, where he died and lies buried near Greenville, Bond County.

WILLIAMSON PLANT was a native of Virginia; was born in the county of Louisa in 1763. He early enlistedin the war in the Fifth Regiment, under Captain Richard Clough in the Virginia line of troops. He again enlisted in the militia, serving at various times until the close of the war. He came to Illinois, settling in Bond County in the town of Pocahontas, where he died in 1830, and is buried in the old grave-yard there. Bond County will doubtless add names to this honor list of soldiers. Their record of service will be given in a future issue of the Historical Journal.

CLINTON COUNTY

JOHN CARRIGAN served in the war from Georgia. Coming to Illinois, he settled on Crooked Creek six miles east of Carlyle, Clinton County. He died and is buried on the land where he located...Clinton County History, pub. Phila. 1881.

ELIAS CHAFIN was a native of South Carolina, where he served in the war. He came to Illinois before 1825, settling in Clinton County in Sugar Creek Precinct. He served on the grand jury in 1825. He was born in 1760. He was pensioned.

JOHN DUNCAN served in the war from Virginia. He removed to Kentucky and from there to Illinois, settling in the southwest part of Clinton County. He died on the farm where he settle, in 1842. He was pensioned.

JOHN KING served in the war from South Carolina. He came to Illinois in 1817, settling in Shoal Creek Precinct, Clinton County, Illinois. He was pensioned.

HUGH JOHNSON served in the war from North Carolina. After the war he removed to Kentucky, and in 1812 he came to Illinois, but removed to Missouri, returning to Clinton County, Illinois, settling near Trenton, where he died, aged 85 years...North Carolina Records, and Clinton County History.

MOSES LAND served in the war from Virginia. Coming to Illinois, he resided for a time in St. Clair County bur removed to Clinton County, where he died. He was pensioned.

THOMAS L. MOORE served with George Rogers Clark, as a sergeant in Capt. Uriah Springer's company Virginia troops. He came to Clinton County, Illinois, where he applied for a pension. He received a grant of land for his service in the war...Virginia Records.

WILLIAM MYERS served as a privateer in the Virginia troops. He removed to Clinton County, Illinois, where he applied for a pension. He was granted a body of land for his war service...Virginia Records

PETER OUTHOUSE enlisted in Fredericktown, Maryland, in the Seventh Regiment, serving from August, 1780; again from October 26, 1780, under Lieutenant Wm. Lamar, Capt. Lloyd Beall, in the ninth company, serving until November, 1783, when he was discharged. He removed to Kentucky, and in 1818 came to Clinton County, Illinois, settling in the southwest part of the county, where he died. He was pensioned.

JACOB SEABRAVES enlisted in Granville County, North Carolina, in 1778, serving two and one-half years under Capt. Joseph Rhodes, Col. Dixon. He was in the battle of Eutaw Springs and several skirmishes. He removed to Tennessee and from their to Clinton County, Illinois, where he died June 7, 1835. He was pensioned.

MICHAEL TEDRICH was from North Carolina; he was born at sea May 10, 1752. He enlisted in Anson County, North Carolina, serving three different times, three times each with Capts. William Hay, Solomon Wood and Robert High, under Col. Malmerday. He came to Clinton County, Illinois, where he died February 10, 1834. He was pensioned.

McDONOUGH COUNTY

JONAS HOBART was born in New Hampshire November 15, 1744. His brother, Isaac, was killed at the battle of Bunker Hill; hearing of his death, Jonas determined to enter the service and enlisted March 17, 1777, serving as corporal in the Fourth Company, First Regiment, New Hampshire troops. He was in the battle of Ticonderoga, where he was wounded, a bullet striking his cheek, knocking out two teeth and finally lodging against his left collar bone. This was removed by the use of a pocket knife. The bullet and one tooth are preserved by a descendant. He was discharged January 1, 1781. Coming to Illinois, he lived for a time in Schuyler County, but removed to McDonough County, where he died November, 1833, and is buried in the Foster Cemetery, Eldorado Township. He was pensioned.

MOSES JUSTUS was born in Maryland in 1755. He enlisted in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, serving as a "Minute Man" under Capt. John Fifer, July, 1775; again in June 1779, and in February, 1781, under Capts. Samuel Patton, Caleb Fifer and James Newell, with Cols. John Fifer and ? Tinnon. He was in the battles of Stono and Wetzell's Mills. Coming to Illinois, he settled in Schuyler County, but removed to McDonough County, where he died at an advanced age. He was pensioned.

WILLIAM WILLARD was born in Loudoun County, Virginia, in 1755; he entered the service in July, 1778, serving under Capt. James Ratekin and Col. Abraham Shepherd. Later he served with Capt. William Douglass and Col. William Russell. He first resided in Morgan County, Illinois, but died in Emmet Township, McDonough County, near Colchester, November 9, 1846. He was pensioned.

JERSEY COUNTY

WILLIAM BATES was born in Pennsylvania in 1759. He served in the First South Carolina Regiment, commanded by Col. Charles Pinckney, from April 14, 1776, to December 1776. Coming to Illinois in 1835, he located in Madison County, where he died February, 1848, but was buried at Jersey Landing, now Elsah, Jersey County. He was pensioned.

JONATHAN COOPER was born in Maryland, but served in the war in Pennsylvania as a drummer. He removed to Kentucky and came to Illinois in 1835, settling four miles southwest of Jerseyville, where he died August, 1845. He was pensioned while living in Kentucky.

WILLIAM GILLHAM was one of the famous Gillham family of sons, who served in the war from South Carolina. He came to Madison County, Illinois, with his brothers, but removed to Jersey County, where he died...Family History and County Records.



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