When Illinois was admitted to the Union in 1818, nine-tenths of the population was south of the geographical center, and the entire State north of where Shelbyville now is, was almost a wilderness, there being few settlements.

To Randolph and St. Clair counties belong the honor of the earliest settlements, and in these two counties are a larger number of Revolutionary soldiers buried than in any counties in the State.

ELEAZER ALLEN was a native of Connecticut, born in 1755. He enlisted May 1, 1775, for eight months with Capt. James Chapman; again Jan. 1, 1776, for one year under the same captain, and with Col. Samuel Parsons in what was known as "Parson's Continentals." He was in the battles of New York, King's Bridge, and White Plains. He early came to Illinois, settling in ST. Clair County, where he applied for a pension. He died in 1828 and is buried in Shiloh precinct.

NATHANIEL BELL was born March 15, 1755, in Warren County, North Carolina. He enlisted in Anson County, April 1, 1776, serving fourteen months under Capt. Thomas Potts, Col. Isaac Huger, South Carolina troops; he enlisted again September, 1781, for two months with Capt. Harris, Col. William Loften, North Carolina troops. He came to Illinois, settling in St. Clair County, where he died January 17, 1835.

THOMAS BRADY was a resident of Cahokia before the Revolution. Learning of the struggle of the colonies, he raised a small company of men in 1777 and marched to St. Joseph, Michigan. They captured the garrison, but returning, they were overtaken at Calumet and in a skirmish which ensued, two were killed and Brady was taken prisoner. The following year he escaped and finally reached Cahokia. He served under Col. Clark and was elected sheriff of St. Clair County. He died in Cahokia.

M. BOISMENUE was one of the soldiers with Thomas brady in the expedition against St. Joseph, Michigan. He was wounded and remained with the Indians all winter, returning to Cahokia in the spring. He also served with Col. Clark. He died in Cahokia.

MRS. THOMAS BRADY was better known as Madam La Compt. She was born of French parents in 1734, at St. Joseph, Michigan. She removed to Cahokia, Illinois, in 1770. She rendered distinct service to the Americans by preventing Indian outbreaks during the Revolutionary War. After the death of Mr. Brady she took the name of her second husband, La Compt. She died in 1843 in Cahokia, aged 109 years.

JOSEPH CARR was born in Virginia in 1752, served in the Virginia troops. After the war he came to Illinois in 1793, settling in Freeburg, St. Clair County, where he died March 6, 1817.

JOHN COLLINSWORTH was born in Virginia in 1761 and served with the Virginia troops. After the war he removed to Claiborne County, Tennessee, and from there came to St. Clair County, Illinois, where he died. He was pensioned.

JOHN CONN was a soldier with Colonel Clark. He settled in Cahokia and died there in 1780.

JOSEPH JONES was a native of Maryland. He enlisted May 30, 1778, for three years in Pulaski's Loyal Legion. He served as a substitute from Anne Arundel County, Maryland. He came to St. Clair County, Illinois, to reside and died there August 26, 1826. He was pensioned in St. Clair County in 1823.

THOMAS KNIGHTEN was a native of South Carolina; was sergeant in the Continental troops. He came to St. Clair County, Illinois, and died there. He was born in 1750; was pensioned.

JOSEPH LAMBERT was from Virginia and served from that State. He came to St. Clair County, Illinois, to reside, where he died.

RISDON MOORE...the Moore family came to America from Wales in 1732, settling in Delaware. Risdon Moore served in the Delaware troops during the war. After the war, he went to North Carolina, and from there to George. In 1812 he came to Illinois, settling in St. Clair County. He was speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives in 1814, and was a member of the First, Third and Fourth Legislatures. He was strongly opposed to making Illinois a slave State. He died in 1828 and is buried three miles east of Belleville.

REV. EDWARD MITCHELL was born in Cecil County, Maryland, August 3, 1760; removed with his parents to Virginia, settling in Fincastle, Botetourt County. He enlisted first as a private, then corporal, and was made captain of the First Virginia Rifles; was in the battles of Guilford Court House and Haw River. He was also quartermaster in Col. William Campbell's regiment. He came to St. Clair County, Illinois, in 1818, settling at Turkey Hill. He died December 3, 1837, and is buried on a farm near Belleville.

LIEUTENANT JAMES MITCHELL was born in Cecil County, Maryland, March, 1727. He was the father of Edward, and came with him to St. Clair County, Illinois, in 1818. He served in the Albemarle Barracks, was also in the battles of Guilford Court House and Clover Lick, May 1, 1780. Is buried near Belleville.

CAPTAIN JOSEPH OGLE was born in Virginia. He commanded a company of Virginia troops. His commission was signed by Patrick Henry and is now in the possession of a descendant. He came to Illinois in 1785 from Wheeling, Virginia, settling first in New Design. In 1802 he was a pioneer in locating in Ridge Prairie, near the present town of O'Fallon, where he died in 1821. Captain Ogle was one of the prominent citizens of St. Clair County.

WILLIAM PADFIELD was born in Maryland. He enlisted in the Revolutionary War and served as a driver of a provision wagon. He removed to Kentucky, and from there came in 1815 to Illinois, settling in Summerfield, where he died, aged 75 years, and is buried three miles south of Summerfield.

DAVID PHILLIPS was born in Orange County, North Carolina, in 1755. He served in the North Carolina troops, but after the war removed to Kentucky, and then to St. Clair County, Illinois, settling on Richland Creek, north of Belleville. He died in 1826 on the farm where he settled.

CAPTAIN JAMES PIGGOTT was born in Connecticut. He served in the privateering business; removed to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where he commanded a company, being made captain April 6, 1776, serving under General St. Clair. He was in the battles of the Brandywine, Saratoga and other skirmishes. He followed General St. Clair to the west and was placed in command of Fort Jefferson, five miles below the mouth of the Ohio River. He came to St. Clair County and established a fort in 1783, west of Columbia, Monroe County. In 1795 he built a ferry between East St. Louis and St. Louis. He died in East St. Louis in 1799.

JOHN PRIME (or PRIMM) was born in Stafford County, Virginia. He served in the Virginia troops and was pensioned for service. He came to St. Clair County, Illinois, in 1803, settling near Belleville, where he died in 1836, aged 87 years. He was present at the surrender of Cornwallis.

JOHN PULLIAM was born in Botetourt County, Virginia. He served in the Virginia troops in the war; removed to Kentucky and from there came to New Design, Monroe County, in 1796. Later he lived in Fayetteville, St. Clair County, where he died in 1813.

MARTIN RANDLEMAN was native of South Carolina, and served from that State in the Revolutionary War. He came to Illinois in 1801 and a year later settled in Belleville. He drew a pension in 1831, and died in St. Clair County.

HOSEA RIGGS was born in Virginia in 1760. He served in the Pennsylvania line of troops. He came to Illinois in 1796, settling in the American Bottom, Monroe County; later he removed to St. Clair County and lived two miles east of Belleville, where he died October 29, 1841, very aged. He was an exhorter in the Methodist Church and was the first minister of that denomination in the county.

LARKIN RUTHERFORD was one of George Rogers Clark's soldiers; was at the storming of Fort Sackville in 1779. He came to St. Clair County in 1800, settling north of Belleville, where he resided for many years, and where he died.

BENJAMIN WEST was born in Maryland in 1743. He removed to Botetourt County, Virginia, and entered the service there. He was on the staff of Gen. George Washington. He came to Illinois in 1818, settling in St. Clair County, near Belleville. He died there, a very aged man.

THE FRENCH IN ST. CLAIR COUNTY

Many French inhabitants of St. Clair county rendered service to Col. George Rogers Clark. Some remained in the county after the close of the war, while many removed to other States and died there. It is reasonable to suppose that the following lived and died in St. Clair County:

MICHEL BEAULIEU was a justice in Clark's court and later was elected justice in the court of the district in 1779. He died in Cahokia soon after this date.

ANTOINE and JOSEPH CESIRE, father and son, were from Lachine, Canada. Both aided Colonel Clark. Antoine was the most important citizen in Cahokia in 1778. He died in 1779. Joseph was one of the justice in 1781.

JEAN BTE. DUBUQUE was a native of Montreal. He was several times elected justice and greatly aided Clark. After the close of the war he was made commandant.

ANTOINE GIRADIN was a prominent citizen of the community. He was a justice in Clark's court, and was elected a justice of the court of the District of Cahokia in 1779, serving several times in this office. He died in 1802.

TURANJEAU GODIN gave financial aid to the Americans and was a justice in Clark's court, also appointed captain at Cahokia. His heirs were living in 1783 in Cahokia.

JEAN BTE. LA CROIX gave financial aid to the Americans, and was a justice in Clark's court.

JOSEPH PELTIER was a soldier under Colonel Clark. He remained in Illinois and was living in St. Clair County after the close of the war; was a member of the militia in 1790.

FRANCIS TROTTIER was one who gave financial aid to the Americans, and was made commandant of Cahokia. He died in Cahokia previous to 1783.

JEAN BTE. SAUCIER was a military engineer. He came to Illinois at an early day and placed Fort de Chartres in 1752. He removed to Cahokia. His son, named for him, was one of the first judges in Cahokia. He died in Cahokia.


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