SANGAMON COUNTY NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS
Submitted by ©Jeanie Lowe

©Illinois Trails History and Genealogy
http://www.iltrails.org



"THE OLD SECOND (NOW KUMLER) METHODIST CHURCH IN 1888---


The Victory banquet scheduled for next Tuesday evening at Kumler Methodist Church, marking the final liquidation of the congregational debt, brings a request for the reprinting of this Family Album picture - with which we are happy to comply. This stronghold of Methodism on the North Side, now occupying the pretentious stone structure on the northeast corner of 5th and Carpenter, shown here, was founded Sept. 11, 1885, to relieve the overcrowded condition at First Methodist Church and to meet the church needs of the fast-growing northern part of the city. Designated as the Second Methodist Church, its first pastor was Rev. W. S. Prentice. Its original membership of 83 has grown to 550. Its first house of worship was the old church which had been used by the Third Presbyterian Church on the northwest corner of 5th and Monroe. It was soon moved to 325 North 5th Street, later the site of the Culver Stone Company offices. The structure shown above was erected in 1886-1887 and dedicated with elaborate ceremonies in September, 1887, in the pastorate of Rev. R. G. Hobbs, who wearing a silk hat, is seen standing in front. A supplementary program which oncluded the remodeling of the church, and the erection of a large educational and recreational building and a new parish house nearby, was carried out in 1926. The church now known as the Kumler M.E. (renamed in 1900 in honor of Rev. J. A. Kumler), has performed an important service and exercised a fine spiritual influence on the North Side for many years. Pastors during the 81 years of its existence have included the Revs W. S. Prentice, J. L. Crane, J. R. Ford, E. D. Wilkin, W. J. Rutledge, Horace Reed, M. D. Hawes, J. F. Stout, W. S. Matthew, G. E. Scrimger, R. G. Hobbs, Chris Gall\eener, J. A. Kumler, C. R. Garlos, M. G. Coleman, A. P. Stover, W. N. McElroy, J. A. Burchit, S. W. Thornton, William Brandon, J. D. Kruell, Wilbert Dowson, G. W. Glagge, J. C. Brown, E. V. Young and the present incumbent, Rev. Austin A. Rodgers, now in his fourth year at Kumler.
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NORTH SIDE ITEM: KUMLER CHURCH IN BUILDING, 1887 --

This picture of the Kumler Methodist Church at 5th and Carpenter Streets when it was under construction in 1887 has been requested as a follow-up of the recent mortgage-burning by that congretation. The structure was dedicated in September of that year during the pastorage of Rev. R. G. Hobbs, who in this picture is shown standing on the steps wearing a silk hat. Originally known as the Second Methodist Church, in 1900 it was renamed in honor of Rev. J. A. Kumler, in recognition of his efforts toward retiring the debt on this building. As we understand it, the recent ceremony concerned the retirement of obligations incurred in later building and remodeling.

Submitted by: ©Jeanie Lowe.


"COLLECTOR'S ITEM: MILDRED PARK WITH "NEW BRIDGE"---


The collapse of the old suspension bridge at Mildred Park - near tragedy of the annual picnic of the Springfield Retail Clerks, in August, 1905 - rather put a quietus on the rest of that season at this popular recreation spit, which was located on the site of the present Bunn Park. But when the Park reopened the following Summer, the attractive and substantial bridge shown here was in place and the festivities went on as before. This is one of the few pictures we have come across which afford a glimpse of the dancing pavilion in its pretty setting under the big trees - and with its nostalgic memories of "tripping the light fantastic" under fancy lights to the music of Springfield's best dance orchestras of that day. We are still looking for a camera shot of the "figure eight" which was another big attraction at the Park in that era.


Submitted by: ©Jeanie Lowe.


THE MUELLER HOME, WEST SIDE LANDMARK, AT 133 S. DOUGLAS---

This pretentious old residence with 160 foot frontage on the west side of Douglas Avenue south of Adams - here pictured in the Nineties - stands on a part of the original site of the Sangamon County Fair Grounds, linked up with the early days here and especially the Lincoln period. The tract was entered in 1824 by Andrew Laswell who disposed of his interests to Washington Crowder, a well-known pioneer figure here, in 1852. John W. Chenery acquired the property in 1866 and built the original house, consisting of six rooms, three upper and three lower, with kitchen and servants' quarters in the basement. However, about the same time Mr. Chenery bought the homestead at Pasfield and Lawrence, and without having lived in this house sold the property to George W. Shutt, lawyer. At that time there were only two other houses in the immediate neighborhood - those of James C. Robinson and D. L. Phillips. The property then comprised a square block, bounded by Adams, Douglas, Monroe and Illinois. In 1874 Mr. Shutt sold to David C. Brinkerhoff, and that same year the latter disposed of the place to Henry R. Mueller, whose son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Ira L. McKinnie, are the present owners. That makes a total of 70 years that the home has been in the Mueller family. Mrs. McKinnie tells us that the property was extensively landscaped in 1884 by Henry Strange, who in addition to constructiong drives, gardens, walks, etc., set out the fine linden and walnut trees which are so beautiful today. That same year, Mr. Mueller enlarged the house to fourteen rooms. There were later alterations in 1918 and 1930, and the house is now a "triplex" while retaining the general appearance of one large residence. The big barn on the place, destroyed by fire some years ago, was the original restaurant on the old Fair Grounds. All down the years of the Mueller occupancy, the home has been noted as a center of hospitality and culture. In particular, many notable musical events have been given there. It is one of the few remaining landmarks of the West Side, linking up the older Springfield with the present.

Submitted by: ©Jeanie Lowe.


WHEN THEY HAD MULE-DRAWN CARS ON SOUTH 2ND STREET---

Today we take you 'way back in Springfield history - yes, to when the South 2nd Street citizenry were served by mule cars in the matter of transportation! Visualize yourself standing in front of where St. Paul's pro-Cathedral now stands, at 2nd and Lawrence (then Wright Street), looking northeast across corner to the old Fowler place. Looks quite primitive, of course, but mule-drawn street cars were then in operation all over town. It was around 1880, shortly after the 2nd Street line had been established as far as Allen Street, the other end of the line being North 9th Street, on out to the Watch Factory, the Rolling Mills and the then County Fair Grounds. The fare was 5 cents but you got 33 tickets for a dollar in those easy days. Horse-drawn cars came later and still later, the regular electric powered cars - in the early Nineties. When the street was widened 12 years ago, the busses came in. South 2nd Street is now on the State Street and West Monroe bus line.
 
Submitted by: ©Jeanie Lowe.

REMEMBER OLD CENTRAL MUSIC HALL AT 4TH AND JEFFERSON?

One of the few well-appointed places of entertainment in Springfield in the Nineties was this substantial structure which stood on the northwest corner of 4th and Washington - known as the Central Music Hall. It was erected in the Eighties by Fred Ihlenfeldt and Frank Wiedlocher, partners in the wholesale flour and feed business. The auditorium, with its reception rooms and other facilities, was a popular place for concerts, theatrical performances - professional and amateur, dances and the like over a considerable period. It presented a very attractive appearance, having an ample stage, comfortable seating accommodations, handsome lighting fixtures and artistic decorative scheme. In the early 1900's, the name was changed to Arion Hall, as it became the headquarters of the Arion Club, a German-American singing society, which had a full calendar of musical and social activities. Our information is that the building was razed in 1929 to make way for a service station. At the time of this picture, the store rooms in front were occupied by a sample room and the E. S. Gard Grocery, while Ihlenfeldt & Wiedlocher utilized the rear part on 4th Street for their business.

Submitted by: ©Jeanie Lowe.


Illinois National Bank Building Was City's First 'Skyscraper'
By Edward Hamann.

The Illinois National Bank building at Fifth and Washington Sts., long a familiar landmark in Springfield, is nearing the end of more than half a century of service to city residents.

The six story building now housing the bank and various other business offices will be razed as soon as the first unit of the new bank edifice is completed possibly late this year.

Workmen began excavating last week for the new building, facing Fifth St. and located just north of the present structure. A second unit will be built later on the site of the old bank building.

The Illinois National Bank was chartered Aug. 10, 1886, and on Aug. 16 of that year the bank started business on the northwest corner of the square.

In 1893, Illinois National officers and directors decided to provide more suitable quarters for the bank and during that year work on erecting the present structure was begun. The building was finished in the latter part of 1894.

It was the first fire proof business structure in Springfield and was also the city's first "skyscraper," its six stories being the pride of the city. At the time there was considerable skepticism as to whether the upper floors ever could be rented.

The offices were rented, however, and for nearly 57 years the building has continued to serve as the home of the Illinois National bank.

Submitted by: ©Jeanie Lowe.

 
ILLINOIS NATIONAL BANK CORNER AS IT LOOKED IN 1889--

If you visualized yourself standing near the corner of 5th and Washington, about where the entrance of the Myers building is now located, and looked across the intersection to the northeast, back in 1889, this is how the old Illinois National Bank corner would appear to you in that quiet era! Springfield was then a city of about 25,000 population. Considering the incessant flow of traffic there today, the corner seems very quiet indeed. Comparatively few people were passing and horse-drawn streetcars and other vehicles, with a few bicycles, met the transportation requirements. The modest two-story brick building with its old-fashioned slanting roof, in which the Illinois National had started business only three years before, contrasts greatly with the present bank building - which, erected in 1893, was Springfield's first fireproof building, likewise its first "skycraper". The officers of the bank at that time were: Dewitt Smith, President; Col. John Williams, first vice-president; Frank Reisch, second vice-president; B. R. Hieronymus, cashier. Henry Merriam is the sold survivor of the organization of that period, having started in as a bookkeeper, and still retaining his connection as a vice-president and director. This early building, incidentally, was the first home of the First National Bank from 1863 to 1878, when it moved to its second building on the northeast corner of the Square. The law firm of Orendorff & Patton then had offices in the second floor, and among the business firms north of the bank on that side of the street were the Henson Robinson Company, the only one left today; Sam Bonansinga and Dominick Maggenti, fruit stores, Levi Harris, clothier, and the North Side Furniture Store. The Orpheum Theatre Building and modern store fronts have transformed the appearance of that whole block. Time marches on!

Submitted by: ©Jeanie Lowe.




THE OLD GERMAN METHODIST CHURCH AT FIRST AND ADAMS---

This attractive little church structure of stone on the southwest corner of First and Adams Streets, now occupied by the Illinois Church Council as its general offices and headquarters, was for many years the home of the old German Methodist church, also known as the Nast Memorial M. E. Church. The congregation was organized in 1862 and its first church home was at Seventh and Mason Street. This building was erected in 1889 as a memorial to Rev. William Nast, clergyman, evangelist and editor, who was the founder of German Methodism in this country. Among the earlier pastors were Rev. Louis Kroeck, Philip Barth, Samuel Saegesser, Rudolph Havighorst and W. H. Schwiering. Rev. David S. Wahl was the pastor at the time of this picture, the late Nineties. Later ministers included Rev. Henry Schutz, J. H. Lemkau, F. E. Neumeyer, A. H. Frank Hertzler, L. J. Duewell, John W. Niehans and Charles M. Ellis. The congregation was absorbed into the First Methodist Church along about the year 1925. The building was then occupied by the Full Gospel Assembly until about 1939, when it became headquarters of the Illinois Church Council. In its heyday the German Methodist Church had a goodly congregation, flourishing Sunday School and very active church societies. Its church orchestra was one of the largest and best known in the city and music was a big feature of the services. The house at left was the church parsonage.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.




THE OLD GLOBE TAVERN OF THE LINCOLN ERA, AT 315 E. ADAMS---

Among the sites associated with the life of Abraham Lincoln in Springfield, and now appropriately designated by bronze markers, is that of the Old Globe Tavern which stood at 315 E. Adams Street. In Mr. Angle's book, "Here I Have Lived," we find this reference to the old landmark: "Of scarcely less interest to the visitors than the new State House, still unfinished (in 1839), were the hotels and taverns. Typical of most of these was the Globe Tavern, on the north side of Adams Street between 3rd and 4th Streets - a plain, two-story wooden structure which also served as an office for several of the stage lines operating in Springfield. Whenever a stage arrived, or a private conveyance for that matter, the clerk would ring a large bell mounted on top of the house, and the stable men would run out from the rear to take charge of the horses. Following their marriage in 1842, Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln, instead of taking a wedding trip, quietly moved to the Gove Tavern, where they secured board and room at $4.00 a week per person. Here Robert T. Lincoln was born in 1843. At that time, the Tavern was operated by a Mrs. Beck, widow. It enjoyed a good reputation, and attracted the patronage of quite a number of young couples who made it their home in the first years of their married life. Among these were Mr. and Mrs. John T. Stuart, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Wallace (in-laws of the Lincolns), and Mr. and Mrs. Albert T. Bledsoe. (It is interesting to note that Mr. Bledsoe, Southern born, was assistant secretary of war in the Confederage government at Richmond, Va., during the Civil War.) Originally, we are told, this tavern was the old Spottswood Hotel, a noated institution in earlier days here. It was in this hotel that Dr. Jacob M. Early was shot and killed by Henry B. Truitt, and in the ensuing trial Mr. Lincoln, as counsel for the defense, for the first time opposed Stephan A. Douglas in court, securing an acquittal. In the middle Fifties the tavern was known as the National House, Willis H. Renfro, proprietor, and in the Sixties as the Owen House, M. Owen, proprietor. Eventually it became a rooming house, and was torn down in the Nineties.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.




AS THE REISCH BREWERY LOOKED IN THE LATE EIGHTIES --
This quaint old woodcut gives an excellent idea of the Reisch Brewery at Rutledge and Herndon Streets as it looked in the Eighties - with smoke pouring from the chimneys and a general air of activity about the plant, and the horsedrawn vehicles further reflecting the period. This well-known concern dates back nearly a hundred years, one of the earliest in this field still in operation. Frank Reisch, the first, came to this country from Niederhausen in the Duchy of Baden, Germany, in 1832, and became a resident of Springfield about 1850. A cooper by trade, in that year he established a small brewery, the start of the present large and well-known Reisch Brewery. His sons and grandsons have been identified with the business all down the years, through the prohibition period to the present time, and with constant expansion. In the period of this picture, the sons - Frank, George and Joseph, comprised the management. The present officers are: Carl M. Reisch, president; George F. Reisch, vice-president; Frederick Frank, Jr., treasurer and general manager; Walter S. Reisch, secretary. Many interesting traditions cluster about the Brewery - for example, those relating to the famous tap room with its huge liter measure of copper, which tests the powers of the guests who enjoy the Reisch hospitality.






WOODCUT OF OLD REVERE HOUSE AT 4TH AND WASHINGTON --
Remember the old Revere House on the northwest corner of 4th and Washington? This interesting woodcut of about 1890 gives a fairly good idea of how it looked in that period. It was a real landmark of its kind. The Revere House was built about 1866 or 1867 bya well-known pioneer citizen, Joel Johnson, who operated it for many years. Following his death, his son, Maj. E. S. Johnson, conducted the hotel until about the middle 90's, when he became custodian of the Lincoln Tomb. It then deteriorated into a rooming house and was razed sometime in the 1930's. In its heyday, the Revere House was an excellent hotel and many fine people lived there. On the main floor was the big hotel lobby, with balconies leading off into the second floor - also "sample rooms" where traveling salesmen could display their wares. On the Washington Street side, there were a few store rooms as well. In the era of the Johnson, the Revere House was a social center and many pretentious events were staged there. It is of interest to note that before building the Revere House, Joel Johnson had operated the old City Hotel, predecessor of the Chenery House, across the street, east.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



(Photograph courtesy of State Historical Library)
RECALLING THE RIDGELY SCHOOL AS IT APPEARED IN 1903 --
Remember that old line from Shakespeare about "the schoolboy, with his satchel and shining morning face, creeping like snail unwillingly to school"? Only a few days more of vacation and then back to the classrooms for thousands of Springfield kids! Out in the far North End, just this side of the State Fair Grounds, hundreds will be wending their way to the Ridgely School on North 8th between Cleveland and Percy Avenues. That building is the remodeled and enlarged version of the original Ridgely School, shown above as it looked in 1903. This original building was erected in 1900, damaged by fire in 1916 and immediately rebuilt and remodeled. The first principal in that period was J. Orville Taylor, Sr.; the second, G. Warren Taylor, in whose incumbency the town of Ridgely (built up around the old rolling mills and named for N. H. Ridgely, pioneer banker here) was annexed to Springfield (1907) and the Ridgely School was taken into the city school system. Subsequent principals were J. M. Humer, I. M. Brock, F. E. Kennedy, J. C. Gannon, Bruce Wheeler, J. W. Cavitt, J. Harry Winstrom and the present incumbent - F. R. Siefferman. Among the early teachers well remembered were: Minnie M. Knox, Ida Comstock, Gertrude Selby, Edith Rockwell, Mae Carver, Clara Kunz (McLaughlin), Nellie M. Ingram. We are told that the School had eight rooms, a principal's office and an auditorium - added a little later. The boys' playground was on the north side, the girls had the south side to themselves, and the "neutral" territory in front was kept well grassed. The town of Ridgely had maintained a school for many years prior to this building, we are told. One story is that it was located on this same site; another that it was just inside the Fair Grounds at 11th and Sangamon Avenue, in the building occupied by the Fair Grounds custodian in later years.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.




Striking evidence of Springfield's growth since the middle of the last century is shown in this picture of the east side of the courthouse square, then the state house square, taken in the 1850's.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



KING'S DAUGHTERS HOME AFTER 1902 FIRE --
While the King's Daughters of Springfield are conducting a drive for funds to build a new heating plant and other replacements at the King's Daughters home, we thought it might be interesting to see this old picture showing the home after the disastrous fire on Jan. 28th, 1902. The King's Daughters home was incorporated under the laws of the State of Illinois on June 6th, 1893, and within two years the present site was purchased. The household started in Oct., 1895, but could accommodate only nine old ladies. After the fire, the members of the home were placed temporarily in a house on E. Edwards St., across from the Congregational church, while the home was being rebuilt. It was ready for occupancy on Nov. 10th, 1902, the old structure having been enlarged to take care of twenty persons. At this time the name was changed to "The Carrie Post" King's Daughters home in honor of the mother of Mr. Charles W. Post, in consideration of his gift of $10,000 given because this had once been his home. In 1921 the home was again enlarged to accommodate 37 old ladies, which number has been maintained up to this time.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



LINDSAY MEMORIAL AT LAKE SPRINGFIELD --
The bust of Vachel Lindsay at the west end of the Lindsay bridge at Lake Springfield attracts the attention not only of Springfield residents but of visitors from all sections of the state. It is the work of Adrian Voisen, noted sculptor. Inscribed on the monument are these words from "On the Building of Springfield" by Lindsay:

"When will they start our vulgar blood athrill
With living language, words that set us free?
When will they make a path of beauty clear
Between our riches and our liberty?
We must have many Lincoln-hearted men.
A city is not builded in a day.
And they must do their work, and come and go.
While counties generations pass away."

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.




THE OLD PALACE LIVERY STABLES AT 206-218 N. 7TH ST. --
There are two things about this old picture which are very reminiscent of the Nineties. Firstly, it portrays a typical livery establishment - which, of course, constituted the background for the "horse-and-buggy" era and therefore was well linked with the social life of the community. Secondly, it is in the form of a woodcut, made from a drawing or sketch, which takes you back many years - before the photo-engraving process was perfected. These were used to illustrate books, magazines, newspapers and all printed matter. There was always a certain charm about woodcuts! The one reproduced herewith shows the old Palace Stables at 206-218 North 7th Street, operated by Charles E. Gehlman, and a rather pretentious establishment it was, claiming a goodly share of the public patronage in competition with such other well known liveries as Little & Son, Salzenstein's, Ira M. Dudley, and Starr & Trumbo. Mr. Gehlman prided himself on the quality of his turnouts and service to his patrons. In common with other such establishments, special attention was given to boarding horses, storing rigs, etc. Opening at this stand in the late Nineties, Mr. Gehlman conducted his stables until about 1912, when automobiles were beginning to monopolize this field of transportation.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



"THE MAJESTIC THEATRE SHORTLY AFTER ITS OPENING, 1907 -
The Majestic Theatre at 419 South 5th Street, hailed as an outstanding addition to the legimate playhouses of Springfield, presented an impressive appearance early in June, 1907, following its opening on May 23. . . . Erected at a cost of $90,000 by Herman Pierik, it was the realization of a long-cherished ambition. The National Amusement Company, the original leasee, contracted to offer Springfield playgoers high-grade attractions at all times, with a top price of 75 cents a seat outside of the boxes. . . . The Majestic was decorated in "ivory and gold with snatches of green." The foyer was forest green walls set off by white, gilt and dark green, was quite elaborate. Inside, hundreds of lights surrounded the stage opening, with seating arrangements providing perfect vision for all. . . . The seating capacity was 1,638, with room for 150 additional seats of needed. The stage - 40 by 80 feet - was thoroughly modern. Equipment and scenery were of the latest design. . . . Legitimate attractions were presented at the Majestic for a number of years, but in 1914 it was sublet to the Orpheum circuit and became a vaudeville house. Still later - in 1927 - it became a movie house. After extensive remodeling, the Frigina Amusement Company reopened it in 1935 as the Roxy Theatre, which name it bears today.
 
 






THE OLD CHARLES W. MATHENY RESIDENCE AT 813 S. 6TH ST. --
Prominent among Springfield's "vanished landmark" homes of the early period was the residence of Charles W. Matheny, shown above, which stood at 813 South 6th Street. Built about 1856, it was one of the pretentious dwellings on that street which Mrs. Lincoln, in writing to her sister in Kentucky, described as "almost palaces of homes" for those times. Charles W. Matheny, son of Charles R. Matheny, one of Springfield's earliest settlers, was a well-known merchant and head of the dry goods firm to which the Bressmer store of today traces its origin. His family occupied the home until the late 1880's, when it was rented to William Eaton Moore for a few years, then passing to E. R. Ulrich. In the early 1900's, W. F. Workman acquired it. The property was sold to St. Joseph's Home for the Aged about 1910, and the home was razed in 1925 to make way for the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



THE GOVERNOR MATTESON RESIDENCE, OPPOSITE MANSION --
There is now known photograph of Governor Joel T. Matteson's palatial residence which stood on the west side of Fourth Street, opposite the official Governor's Mansion, and which, with its outbuildings and grounds, occupied almost a city block. But this artist's sketch from a lithograph of 1860 shows it in its essential details. The property extended from Jackson Street south to the John T. Stuart residence and from Fourth back to Third Street. Governor Matteson, a very wealthy man, was openly contemptuous of the facilities and general style of the Governor's Mansion, and in 1856, before leaving office, erected this costly dwelling for his own use and with avowed intention of "putting to shame" the official residence. It was a real show place - unquestionably the finest home in Springfield and downstate Illinois, and few in Chicago could compare with it in its time. It boasted a large glass-domed conservatory, a great barn and a coach house of equal proportions, a gardener's house, extensive gardens and landscaping, with statuary and other embelishments. Some of these outbuildings are still standing in the rear of residences on the site south of Jackson Street. Its interior furnishings are said to have been very beautiful, including fine paintings and other works of art, imported furniture, etc. Here princely hospitality was dispensed and for years the residence intrigued the interests of visitors to Springfield. Governor Matteson and his family lived there for a number of years, after which the mansion was occupied by his son-in-law and daughter - Mr. and Mrs. R. Eaton Goodell. While members of the family were absent from the city, the residence was wrecked by fire on the night of January 28, 1873, one of the coldest in local history, the thermometer registering 30 degrees below zero. For years thereafter, the property stood in ruins. We are reprinting this feature in response to many requests which have come in from time to time.


Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.




Photograph courtesy of Norman M. Broadwell)
THE OLD S. H. MELVIN DRUG STORE AT 5TH AND WASHINGTON, 1865 --
A rare old picture is this one of the northwest corner of 5th and Washington, showing the establishment of S. H. Melvin, wholesale and retail druggist, in 1865, nearly eighty years ago. The sign bears the old term "Apothecary." for good measure! As a matter of history, the first city directory of Springfield (1855) locates the grocery store of Clarkson Freeman & Co. on this corner, with J. D. Harper, an oculist, quartered upstairs. Mr. Freeman removed to Texas in 1858 and the directory of that year shows J. B. Fosselman operating a drug store on this site. The probability is that Mr. Fosselman erected this building, which was quite substantial for those days. A year later he sold out to S. H. Melvin, and it is said that Abraham Lincoln often dropped into the store to play checkers with Mr. Melvin at leisure times. About the year 1868, Mr. Melvin took in H. H. Glidden as a partner. The 1874 directory shows H. H. Glidden & Co. on this corner; 1875, H. H. Glidden; 1879, C. & J. Correll; 1884-1885, Isaac R. Diller; 1886-1887, Fleury & Co., and 1889, Stuart Broadwell, who adopted the name "Old Corner Drug Store." Mr. Broadwell passed to his reward in 1928, since which time the store has been operated by his son, Norman M. Broadwell. This record reveals an uninterrupted occupancy of the corner as a drug store for 86 years. There have been several remodelings on down to the present beautiful Broadwell Building of today. But this picture is a real "classic" for your colelction. Note the square-topped multipaned windows so characteristic of the Sixties, the garish advertisements of the "stock in trade" - such items as tapioca, herbs, mace, cloves, ginger, mustard, cassia, soda, cream tartar, sulphur, salts, roots, barks, perfumes, gum, soaps, combs, colognes, extracts and pomades! A typical group of the citizenry poses in front. A tobacconist had the store room just beyond and farther north in Hoffman's Row there was a bakery. At left, the Enterprise Buildings adjoined - in all probability the ones still standing on this site. They were still using "apron walks" at street corners in 1865 and the picture shows in the foreground some of the mud streets for which the Illinois capital was then noted. But the flag of the Union was proudly displayed atop the building, for the Civil War had just ended and patriotic sentiment was still running high. This picture should have a special place in your scrapbook of Old Springfield.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



A REAL "CAMERA PAINTING," THE OLD GEHRMANN PLACE IN 1901 ---
Among the storied mansions of Springfield history, there was none more beautiful in its landscape setting and embellishments than the old Gehrmann residence at Third and Calhoun in its prime - as witness this "camera painting" of 1901, one of the finest examples of the work of the late Guy Mathis. Charles A. Gehrmann was one of the leading dry goods merchants here for many years. He took extreme pride in his home which occupied a full block, the substantial brick residence being in the center of the elaborate landscaping which included fine greensward, formal gardens, statuary, driveway and graveled walks, many rare trees and plants, etc. The house itself was beautifully furnished and contained many rare art objects. In the picture, by that pretty white birch tree, we see Miss Adele Gehrmann, standing at left, and her brother Paul Gehrmann, seated in an old-fashioned settee, at the edge of the walk. At the right is the front elevation of the house, almost obscured by the wealth of foliage and shrubbery. In the distance we can glimpse a corner of the gardens. This obviously was in the era of gracious living, in which the Gehrmanns played a prominent part in Springfield. The home was long a center of hospitality. Following the death of her parents, Miss Adele lived there with only the servants for about thirty years. Her older brother, Charles, returned to Springfield about a year ago, and the two lived there in the old home which, with the grounds, had been restored to something of its former state - until last March when Miss Gehrmann died suddenly and her brother also within two months. A sad ending indeed for the local history of this fine old family. A sister, Mrs. Ella Gehrmann Fuller, lives in Altadena, Calif, and Paul Gehrmann, shown in this picture, is a resident of Kansas City, Kans. thus, many memories cluster about this old mansion, including the history of the site prior to its erection in 1872. Here was located the log cabin of William Kelly, one of the famous Kelly brothers from North Carolina, who were the earliest residents of this locality. Incidentally, part of this cabin (the logs of which were removed long since) still is in existence, in the small frame structure, occupied by the gardener, in the rear of the residence.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



(Picture courtesy of Miss Emma Redeker)
REMEMBER THE GERMAN-ENGLISH SCHOOL AT 123 E. JEFFERSON?
Many of the substantial old German families of Springfield received their elementary education in the plain, unpretentious brick building shown at right in the picture above - the old German-English School at 123 E. Jefferson St. It was affiliated with the German Evangelical Lutheran Church, then located on the east side of Third Street near Washington. Records of a parish school have been found as far back as 1856, shortly after the church was organized. This building was erected in 1880 and was used until 1907, when the present Trinity School was built adjoining Trinity Lutheran Church, as the congregation is now known, at Second and Monroe Streets. Hundreds of Springfield men and women of German antecedents have vivid recollections of the thorough and painstaking training there received from such gifted teachers as B. Goesch, S. Gerbing, F. Brinkman, H. Luecker, A. Wilk, E. Flachhart and R. Schoknecht. The frame dwelling at left was the residence occupied by the pastors of the church over a long period.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.





(Photograph courtesy of Mrs. Claence Root, Detroit)
THE GOVERNOR'S MANSION AS IT LOOKED IN 1858 --
This is by all odds the rarest picture of the Governor's Mansionn in its early days that we have ever come across. From all the circumstances surrounding it, we would judge that it goes back to about the year 1858, the same time that the picture of the old State House and the four sides of the public Square were made. It shows the side elevation on the west - the Mansion in its attractive grounds with white gravel walks, shrubbery and landscaping, with a white picket fence enclosing the property. Note the impressive front entrance at left, the conservatory surmounting the roof, the side porch and the little gallery above, from which the ladies of Gov. William H. Bissell's household were watching the proceedings. (This type of photography was a decided novelty in that early day.) In the group, probably, were Mrs. Bissell, the Governor's two daughters by his first marriage - Josephine and Rhoda, and the two adopted daughters. The Mansion was erected in 1856, during the administration of Gov. Joel A. Matteson. Governor Matteson never liked the official residence, regardint ias "too unpretentious" for the dignity and prestige of the office! After retiring as Governor, he proceeded to erect a palatial home just opposite the Mansion on Fourth Street, which was considered the finest residence in the State in its time.
 




MARRIED 50 YEARS - Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur O. Hale, above, 1053 W. Centre, will observe their 50th wedding anniversary Saturday. A family celebration was held April 12 at the Heritage House. Married in Jacksonville on April 19, 1919, Mr. Hale, a retiree from AT&T, and the former Dorothy Hahn are members of the Laurel United Methodist Church. They are the parents of three sons: Wayne of Vandalia; Melvin of Springfield and Glenn of Pleasant Plains; and have ten grandchildren.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



IDE'S ENGINE WORKS SOLD 'IDEAL' ENGINES TO STREET CAR LINES
Ide's Engine Works, founded by Albert E. Ide, sold their "Ideal" steam engines to street car lines, state institutions throughout the west and middle west, and other concerns, including the St. Louis Globe-Democrat. The firm manufactured a number of products, but in its later years concentrated on steam engines. The first electric light plant, a temporary installation, was housed in the Ide engine works. Albert E. Ide held patents for a number of engines and other inventions.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.




INTERNATIONAL SHOE COMPANY, Springfield Plant

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



More than 1000 men were employed by Springfield Iron Co., known as the rolling mills, when this picture of the company store was taken in about 1880. Located in the area north of the city limits and this side of the state fairgrounds in what was then called the town of Ridgely, the company was organized in 1871.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



ARTIST'S VISION OF "ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY," 1850 --
Above is an artist's drawing of "Illinois State University", our first institution of higher learning. It had nothing to do with the University of Illinois at Champaign, established years later. This school had its inception in Hillsboro, Ill., and was transferred to Springfield in 1852, the site being that of the Concordia College of today at 12th and Enos. Only the central part of this building was completed - later to be known as the "Coffee Mill" at Concordia. It was, however, quite a pretentious educational plant and offered splendid advantages for those times. Under its charter it had full collegiate powers but only the literary and theological departments were in operation. Among the stdents from prominent families were Robert T. Lincoln and John Hay, and Mr. Lincoln once delivered an address there. During the Civil War, many of its students served in the Union Army. The institution closed its doors in the late Sixties and Concordia took over the plant in 1875.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



(Photograph courtesy of Mrs. Wilbur O. Hale)
"THOUSANDS OF SPRINGFIELDIANS VISITED THE ST. LOUIS WORLD'S FAIR IN 1904 --
This leaf from a cherished old album of snapshots, taken at the St. Louis World's Fair of 1904, will bring back delightful memories to thousands of Springfield residents who visited this great exposition of culture and entertainment. Mrs. Eldridge, the former Grace Wilson of Springfield, and now a resident of Washington, writes interestingly of the trip which she and her sisters, Win and Laney, with other friends, made to the Exposition and the good times they had. Some of the party may be faintly distinguished in the foreground at left, while in the background may be seen the Palace of Electricity at left, the Louisiana Purchase Monument at far end of the lagoon, and the Palace of Manufactures in Corinthian style at right. Attendants in foreground were looking after some of the many beautiful flower plots which enhanced the landscaping effects. The Exposition occupied 1,142 acres in Forest Park and the plan included 15 large exhibition buildings. There were about 500 other buildings on the grounds, built by foreign governments, the States and Territories or for special exhibits. Total admissions aggregated nearly 20 millions. Will you ever forget the brilliant night displays, the exuberance of the crowds along "The Pike," the Festival organ recitals, the Exposition orchestra, the famed Inside Inn, the Tyrolean Alps, etc. etc.?





(Courtesy of David S. Benjamin)
"EAST SIDE OF THE SQUARE - THE NORTH HALF - FROM AN ETCHING OF 1889--
To the old residenters of Springfield there is a perennial fascination about old etchings or wood cuts of familiar scenes 'way back when. And even the modern generation finds them interesting because of their quaint depiction of the Springfield of earlier days. This conception of the north half of the East Side of the Square is a case in point. The drawing, we understand, was made by some local artist for the old Springfield Monitor, the daily published by Captain T. W. S. Kidd in the 80's and 90's, and used in some special edition. Newspaper cuts were then few and far between. This one was probably around 1889, judging from the merchants represented. By that time, of course, those two classic structures - the Sangamon County Court House and the State Bank, had long since disappeared and had been replaced by the buildings shown above, very creditable for those times. Here we see from left to right: The old First National Bank on the corner. Next, at 102 S. 6th Street, the establishment of Sigmund Benjamin, clothier. At 104, Conway & Co., hatters and gents' furnishings. At 106, George W. Leaverton, wholesale and retail boots and shoes - and notice that mammouth shoe poised on top of the building! At 108-110, Kimber Bros., dry goods. At 112, Sommer & Pierik, watchmakers and jewelers, and R. L. Berry, music store. At 114, the Springfield Marine Bank building of that period, and in the basement of the office of Edwin A. Wilson, real estate and loans. It is interesting to note the architectural styles of that period. The First National Bank was probably the oldest structure, and the Marine Bank the most modern, in the row. The usual number of lawyers, doctors, et al had offices in the upper floors. Quite a different scene today!

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.





A QUAINT OLD LITHOGRAPH OF ST. NICHOLAS HOTEL, IN 1890 --
This is an interesting call-back to the familiar structure of the old St. Nicholas Hotel which stood on the southeast corner of 4th and Jefferson for around 85 years. This old portion of the Hotel was built by J. D. Freeman in 1856. In 1862, John McCreery, in partnership with James Sponsler, took over its operation. Five years later, he bought out Mr. Sponsler, after which he continued active in its management until 1901. His son, John H. McCreery, then took over and upon his death in 1920 the control passed to the Bartholf family, with H. B. Bartholf as president of the company. Since 1943, the hotel has been operated by Nelson D. West, with Joseph E. West as manager. The 12-story addition was built in 1925 and about five years ago the old part was almost entirely replaced. The old St. Nicholas was the scene of countless social, political and business gatherings in the city's history. Then, as now, it had a reputation for the excellence of its cuisine and accommodations. And - from time immemorial it has been "Democratic headquarters."

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



ENGINE SWITCHED CARS AT THE OLD SPRINGFIELD IRON WORKS
Thomas Kavanaugh switched cars at the old rolling mill - Springfield Iron Works - with a team of horses, until the company, keeping in step with the times, purchased the switch engine that became known to the workers as "The Dummy." George Pearl was engineer, Manuel DeFreitas, fireman, and John O'Neal, switchman.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.




SPRINGFIELD'S FIRST Y.M.C.A. BUILDING --
The present Fox-Lincoln theater building at the northwest corner of Fifth and Capitol Ave., is the first Y.M.C.A. building in Springfield. The picture above taken about 1889 shows the structure when occupied by the "Y." The Y.M.C.A. movement dates back to 1866 in Springfield but it was 18 years later that the first Y.M.C.A. building was erected. A drug store and woman's exchange occupied the first floor while the public library and "Y" occupied the second. The Springfield Business college of which Henry B. henkel and Stephen Bogardus were proprietors occupied the third floor.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.




HOW BARNUM FEATHURED JUMBO WHEN SHOW WAS HERE IN 1884--
Remember Jumbo, Barnum's great circus elephant, the biggest animal ever tamed? If you do, you must be one of the real old-timers - around here when the show came through in 1884! In any event you have probably heard of this "largest of pachyderms" which headlined Barnum & Bailey, "way back when. The billboard poster shown above was of the type the show's advance men put up on that memorable visit to Springfield. It lured many patrons out to the old show grounds out on North 8th Street near Enos Park. When Barnum saw this great beast in the Royal Zoological Gardens in London, he couldn't rest till he had him in his circus. In 1882, he bought him for $10,000, took him to America and made him famous. Jumbo was killed in Canada in 1885, when he was struck by a locomotive. Of course, all such posters were exxaggerated in the flamboyant circus style - note the crowd of children parked on his back! - but Jumbo was really the biggest show elephant of them all, standing 11 feet 6 inches in height and weighing 14,000 pounds - far above the average.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



WHEN THE CITY HALL WAS SPRINGFIELD'S REAL PRIDE AND JOY
Back in the Nineties the local citizenry pointed with pride to the "magnificent new City Hall," as it was termed in those days. It was the first city building that Springfield had ever owned. Prior to 1894, the date of its erection, the city had been only a tenant renting office space here and there. Agitation for the building began in 1892, but a financing plan was not adopted until March 29, 1893, when the proposition submitted by W.H. Conkling, E.W. Payne, P.W. Harts and George Reisch was approved by the City Council. It provided for the payment of $470 a month for ten years, conditioned on the purchase by the city of the lot at 7th and Monroe for $10,000. The architect was S. A. Bullard, later Mayor, and the building was finished a few days ahead of the time set - March 1, 1894. The design of the building was Romanesque, modernized; the first floor of stone and the superstructure of buff-colored pressed brick and sandstone trimmings. As originally used, the entire third floor was the city library. There have been two or three remodelings but the appearance of the structure is about the same today. Of course, all agree that the city imperatively needs a new building, and there have been many discussions about a combined city and county structure. The Municipal Auditorium idea, so vigorously advocated by this newspaper through V. Y. Dallman, its editor-in-chief, is also gathering momentum rapidly, and following the war some action in this direction should be first on the agenda. Certainly a city of the wealth and prestige of Springfield, the Capital of the State, should be adequately represented in these respects.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



(Photograph courtesy of Prof. Richard C. Neitzel)

GLIMPSING BACK TO OLD CONCORDIA COLLEGE IN 1874--
It is indeed a privilege and a pleasure to turn back the pages of local history seventy years and through this rare old photograph visualize Concordia College, one of Springfield's most honored education institutions, as it looked shortly after it opened its doors in 1874. The main building itself with its three professors' houses on the east was not a new structure. It had housed what was once known as "Illinois State University," predecessor of Concordia on this site, and dating back to 1852 - an ambitious institution prominent in this part of the country for years, with a resident faculty and a considerable student body. Abraham Lincoln, whose son Robert was a student, made an address at the dedicatory exercises. When that school suspended operations, the property was taken over by the Missouri Synod of Evangelical Lutheran Church and Concordia College was moved here from St. Louis in 1874. The majestic building here shown is revered in Concordia history as "The Coffee Mill," a landmark which disappeared from the campus in 1931 to make room for a new and modern college building. The row of professors' houses at right has since been extended from three to seven. The Seventies were the days of small things at Concordia and yet even then the standards were high and the early alumni went out from its halls to make splendid records in all parts of the world. Springfield may well be proud of this institution, one of the most prominent theological seminaries of the Church. Its work is carried on quietly but very efficiently, with earnest students and a faculty of fine, conscientious professors, devoted to their ideals of building manhood and preparing worthy ministers of the gospel.
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This rare old photograph shows the Sangamon county courthouse as it appeared in 1899-1901 when it was being raised to permit addition of a new first story in order to provide more room. Until 1876 the building, begun in 1837, served as capitol of the state of Illinois. In 1876 state officials moved to the present statehouse and the building became the courthouse.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.




The old Culver Construction Co., owned by Col. James S. Culver, occupied most of the block on the north side of Madison St., between Eighth and Ninth Sts. and suspended business about 1912 following Culver's death, after operating for almost a quarter century. The plant was equipped with a 30 ton locomotive crane, saws, planers and lathes and had in separate buildings complete blacksmith, carpenter, paint and steamfitting shops. The Culver Company did general contracting in all classes of construction. Colonel Culver commanded the Fifth Infantry, Illinois National Guard, in the Spanish-American war and was long identified with state militia activites in general.
 



OLD DODDS CORNER AS IT
LOOKED IN THE EIGHTIES--
A famous corner indeed, linked with Springfield history for 80 years! As we say good-bye to it, let's draw back the curtain to 1866 when W. R. Beall opened the first drug store - and a good one - on this site in the then new Conkling Block. In the late 1870's R. N. Doods took over. From then on to his death in 1921, distinctive traditions were built up - continued by W. E. Claypool until his passinb about the first of this year. Old Dodds Corner on the northwest corner of 5th and Monroe was the joint transfer point and community meeting place - "a sort of junction point between the diurnal toil of money-making and the tranquil rest of the fireside." With little variation the same people met there twice a day and often at night. Mr. Dodds proded himself on his prescription service and the quality and variety of his merchandise. Alert attendants dispensed to thirsty thousands Doodds' famous ice cream soda - from "the magnificent fountain for the drink that refreshes and cools but does not inebriate." Husbands and wifes, sweethearting couples and the citizenry in general made this a meeting place. Quite a social center, all in all! On the Monroe Street side, the last door had a little puch-button - that was for the night prescription clerk, who slept there always on call. Yes, a great place was Dodds Corner and long to be remembered in the annals of Springfield!




(Photograph courtesy of Robert L. Ide)
"THE OLD FOWLER MANSION ON 2ND STREET IN THE 60'S--
Our picture of the Jess residence the other day stimulated a great deal of collateral interest in the old Fowler place which at an earlier period occupied that entire block between Cook and Lawrence, and Second and Third Streets. So here's the Fowler place - viewed from about the corner of Second and Lawrence, looking northeast to the mansion, which stood a little north of the center of the block, facing on Second Street - as it appeared in the late Sixties. The record shows that in 1850, John E. Roll bought five acres of ground which included this block, that part of the block north as far as the old Sommer home, and a part of the frontage of Capitol View Apartments and the Legion Home on the west side, down to Cook Street, also some frontage south of Cook on that side where Mr. Roll built another fine home. We have already given you the chain of the south half of the Fowler block on which the old Jess residence stands today. The north half Mr. Roll acquired in 1850, as we have said. On this half, just north of center in the block, he built the pretentious home shown above, in 1858. Four years later, he sold the property to Sophia S. Fowler, wife of Dr. Edwin S. Fowler, for $21,000. The Fowlers occupied this residence and the full block of grounds until sometime in the early Nineties, when it was gutted by fire. As will be noted, it was quite a show place, with many fine trees, elaborate landscaping, and with a number of white marble statues placed about the grounds - which Dr. Fowler, who was a government contractor in Civil War times, had brought to Springfield from Southern plantations. One of these statues appears in right foreground in the picture. After the mansion burned, the ruins were left standing for a number of years and the beautiful grounds were soon covered with weeds and underbrush. But there was a certain wild beauty about the place, and the pathways criss-crossing the property bore witness to the lure it had for people passing that way. Incidentally it was a favorite rendezvous for the kinds of that era and "cops and robbers" was played all over the place! About 1900, this block was subdivided under the name of "Lincoln Place," and a number of attractive residences were built there in subsequent years. (Acknowledgments to Sangamon County Abstract Co. for title information.)

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.




WHEN THE FRANZ BROTHERS' PACKING HOUSE WAS IN ITS HEYDAY HERE--
Among Springfield's "vanished industries," the packing house of B. Franz & Bro. deserves special mention. For years a leading establishment of its kind in Central Illinois, its history reflected the opportunities afforded worthy enterprises in this community in the early period and paid tribute to the industry and initiative displayed by this family, so well known in the meat business. John B. Franz, better known as Baptiste Franz, was a native of Baden, Germany, and came to this country in 1865 at the age of 18 to seek his fortune. After some experience in various meat shops, following the family tradition, he opened a stall in the old market house at 4th and Monroe in June, 1859. By 1872 he was in position to rent the entire building - over which he exercised complete control until 1876, when he bought the 5th and Madison corner and erected a substantial building for his retail trade. A brother, Fredoline, arriving from Germany in 1876, was taken into partnership three years later. Gradually the firm entered the wholesale trade while retaining its retail outlet, and erected the large and commodious packing plant shown above, located about a mile northwest of town. Franz Brothers had the first ice machine in the city, also their own electric light plant. On down the years to about 1918, when the firm suspended operations, it developed into one of the best known packing houses in this territory, with a large and profitable business. Both Baptiste and Fredoline Franz have been dead for a number of years, but members of the family are still active in the meat business and in other enterprises and are identified with all movements for the community's advancement, as were the original partners.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



(From the Burke Vancil Collection)
" KNEE-DEEP IN JUNE" AT THE OLD CHENERY RESIDENCE, 1896--
As a perfect call-back to the era of gracious living in Springfield, we give you this setting of the old Chenery residence with its spacious lawn and all-pervading atmosphere of the peace and serenity of a summer's day in 1896. . . . This would bring back to the late William Dodd Chenery many memories of happy, care-free days spent at this old homestead on the southwest corner of Pasfield and Lawrence Avenue. He would discover himself in this picture lolling back on one of those old fashioned settees, at left, surrounded by cushions and perusing his favorite magazine! . . . Note the substantial character of the home, the fine forest trees, the expanse of well-kept lawn enclosed by a neat picket fence, the raised wooden sidewalk leading to the street, the generous-sized wooden chair - and, last but not least, that big comfortable hammock! . . . A tennis court and croquet grounds were among the other outdoor attractions of this hospitable home which in its day was quite popular with "the younger social set."

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.



(Lithograph courtesy of Mrs. Wilbur Hale)
" OLD LITHOGRAPH OF PROMINENT SPRINGFIELD CHURCHES-- Among the lithographs appearing in various souvenir booklets of Springfield in the Nineties, the one shown above is one of the most interesting groups of churches that we have seen. Here we see an artist's conception of three well-known downtown churches in that period - left to right: 1. First Presbyterian Church at 7th and Capitol Avenue. 2. St. Paul's pro-Cathedral at 3rd and Adams Streets. 3. First Christian Church at 5th and Jackson Streets. This was the second church building occupied by the First Presbyterian congregation, erected in 1868 and still in use, minus that noble spire. The organization dates back to 1823. Old St. Paul's pro-Cathedral was built in 1847, the first edifice of this denomination established in Springfield in 1835. It was razed in 1912. The Christian Church shown above was erected in 1890. It was the third building of this congregation - which was then the only one of this denomination in the city, organized in 1833. It was razed about the year 1913. This lithograph is typical of the fanciful illustrations in those quaint old souvenir booklets.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.




"RECALLING THE HAY-BROWN RESIDENCE, SITE OF NEW Y.M.C.A.--
When the Y.M.C.A. directors acquired the southwest corner of 4th and Cook Streets for the site of the future building, they chose a historic as well as advantageous location. On that half-block of ground stood the spacious and well-appointed Hay-Brown residence, shown above, for many years the domicile of one of Springfield's best kown and most prominent families. Back in the 1850's, there had been a small dwelling on this lot, the home of Seymour Moody, one-time assistant postmaster of Springfield. In the early 1860's the property was acquired by Milton Hay, prominent lawyer, and the Moody home was razed. Mr. Hay then erected a substantial home, nucleus of the pretentious one shown here, of about 1889. His son, Logan Hay, late senior member of his father's law firm, lived here until his marriage. In the early 1880's Mr. Milton Hay had the home remodeled and enlarged for his daughter, Miss Kate Hay, who became Mrs. Stuart Brown. Following his death in 1893, the Stuart Browns occupied the residence until their passing in the 1920's. The last occupants of the house were their daughter, Miss Jane Logan Brown, and their son, Milton Hay Brown, and his family. The structure was razed in 1934. The Hays and Browns were long prominent in Springfield society life, and the many notable receptions and parties given in that era are well remembered by the older generation.

Submitted by: Jeanie Lowe.


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